Eduard Bf 109E-1 Weekend Edition — 1:48 Scale

The Messerschmitt Bf 109 is one of the most storied warplanes of the 20th century and one of the most popular subjects for scale model kits.  It has been the subject of several hundred injection-molded kits along with more esoteric limited-run resin and vacuform offerings in just about every imaginable scale.  In this review, we sit down with Eduard’s recent release of a their very straightforward Weekend Edition of their 1:48 scale Bf 109E-1 kit. 

Eduard’s 1:48 scale Tempest Mk. V Series 2 kit comes on five injection molded polystyrene sprues containing 172 parts.  In this version of this kit, about 40 of these parts will go unused.  Twenty-two clear parts come on two clear sprues. Markings for two airplanes are provided:

  • Tempest Mk. V, JF-E, flown by F/Lt. Pierre Clostermann, No. 3 Squadron, RAF, Kastrup, Denmark, July 1945
  • Tempest Mk. V, EJ705, No. 80 Squadron, RAF, 2nd TAF, Autumn 1944

Strengths:  As a Weekend Edition kit, this boxing of Eduard’s Tempest Mk. V is a streamlined boxing of this kit, with just the plastic and only two sets of markings options.  It’s been around for a while now and has garnered a reputation for accurate overall size and shapes.  The surface airframe detail is excellent, featuring crisp and restrained panel lines.  There are also a mix of raised and recessed screw, rivet, and fastener detail is so intricately executed.  The surface detail on this kit is jaw-dropping.  The ailerons, rudder, and elevators are separate parts and can be positioned as desired.  The canopy can also be positioned opened or closed.  The full span, single-piece lower wing ensures you will get the correct dihedral.  Test fits of the fuselage and wing halves look to be flawless, though some builders have reported a few tricky fits here and there.  

The kit cockpit is okay for injection molding, and it features a sufficient level of detail. Instrument panel details are represented by decals.  Scale modelers will be very impressed by the fidelity of detail in the main gear, main gear wells, and tail wheel wells and gear doors.  You can read the “Dunlop” imprimatur on the main gear tire sidewalls.  The structures of the main gear wells appear to be very well represented, only lacking wire bundles or plumbing.  The main gear themselves and their retraction cylinders and other struts are very nicely detailed and crisply molded.  Further, ejection pin marks are out of the way and won’t be bothering anyone.  Other smaller details are to be commended, too, including the exterior lights and very nicely printed decals that represent the straps on the drop tank pylons.  Drop tanks are included on Sprue G – but it’s not clear to me why they are molded in clear plastic.

The markings were printed in-house by Eduard. Colors appear accurate, vibrant, and in register.  Carrier film is fairly thin and quite well restrained.  The print fidelity, including for the finest airframe stencils, is very good.  I also like the choice of schemes represented here. 

Weaknesses: The injection-molded instrument panel is a little basic, and I would recommend using the kit-supplied instrument panel decal. While seatbelts and harnesses are provided, they are in decal form (not your reviewer’s favorite choice for belts).

Eduard’s 1:48 scale Tempest Mk. V Series 2 kit comes on five injection molded polystyrene sprues containing 172 parts.  In this version of this kit, about 40 of these parts will go unused.  Twenty-two clear parts come on two clear sprues. Markings for two airplanes are provided:

  • Tempest Mk. V, JF-E, flown by F/Lt. Pierre Clostermann, No. 3 Squadron, RAF, Kastrup, Denmark, July 1945
  • Tempest Mk. V, EJ705, No. 80 Squadron, RAF, 2nd TAF, Autumn 1944

Strengths:  As a Weekend Edition kit, this boxing of Eduard’s Tempest Mk. V is a streamlined boxing of this kit, with just the plastic and only two sets of markings options.  It’s been around for a while now and has garnered a reputation for accurate overall size and shapes.  The surface airframe detail is excellent, featuring crisp and restrained panel lines.  There are also a mix of raised and recessed screw, rivet, and fastener detail is so intricately executed.  The surface detail on this kit is jaw-dropping.  The ailerons, rudder, and elevators are separate parts and can be positioned as desired.  The canopy can also be positioned opened or closed.  The full span, single-piece lower wing ensures you will get the correct dihedral.  Test fits of the fuselage and wing halves look to be flawless, though some builders have reported a few tricky fits here and there.  

The kit cockpit is okay for injection molding, and it features a sufficient level of detail. Instrument panel details are represented by decals.  Scale modelers will be very impressed by the fidelity of detail in the main gear, main gear wells, and tail wheel wells and gear doors.  You can read the “Dunlop” imprimatur on the main gear tire sidewalls.  The structures of the main gear wells appear to be very well represented, only lacking wire bundles or plumbing.  The main gear themselves and their retraction cylinders and other struts are very nicely detailed and crisply molded.  Further, ejection pin marks are out of the way and won’t be bothering anyone.  Other smaller details are to be commended, too, including the exterior lights and very nicely printed decals that represent the straps on the drop tank pylons.  Drop tanks are included on Sprue G – but it’s not clear to me why they are molded in clear plastic.

The markings were printed in-house by Eduard. Colors appear accurate, vibrant, and in register.  Carrier film is fairly thin and quite well restrained.  The print fidelity, including for the finest airframe stencils, is very good.  I also like the choice of schemes represented here. 

Weaknesses: The injection-molded instrument panel is a little basic, and I would recommend using the kit-supplied instrument panel decal. While seatbelts and harnesses are provided, they are in decal form (not your reviewer’s favorite choice for belts).

Eduard’s Weekend Edition kit of the 1:48 scale Tempest Mk. V Series 2 is a streamlined plastic kit edition of this kit. Fans of WWII, RAF, and Tempest-related subject matter, will certainly enjoy this issue of the kit, and its relative simplicity, nice detail, and classic markings options extends an invitation to the scale modelers looking for a more straightforward build without all the detail part bells and whistles.  

Sincere thanks are owed to Eduard for the review sample.  You can visit them on the web at http://www.eduard.com and on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/EduardCompany. Also, thanks to Ben Pluth for sharing observations on his in-progress build of the Eduard Tempest.

 

Haagen Klaus
Scale Modeling News & Reviews Editor
Detail & Scale